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Marriage and Divorce

  • Andrew VillageEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The late twentieth century was a time of profound change in attitudes and behaviours related to cohabitation, marriage and divorce in England. The Church of England responded to this by adjusting its teaching and practice in relation to matters such as cohabitation, marrying divorcees in church or ordaining those who have been divorced and remarried. This chapter begins by examining some of those changes using national and church statistics, and by noting some of the key teaching documents that were issued by the Church of England in the decades prior to and during the survey period. The data reported cover three items related to cohabitation and two items related to divorce and remarriage. The results show how opinion varied across different groups in the Church, and how the pattern changed between surveys as attitudes became more accepting. These changes affected most birth cohorts, but to different extents, altering the way opinion related to age between 2001 and 2013.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.York St John UniversityYorkUK

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