Advertisement

Determination of the Optimal Number of Trailers for Milk-run Intralogistics System

  • Kamila KluskaEmail author
Chapter
Part of the EcoProduction book series (ECOPROD)

Abstract

This chapter describes the author’s method of designation of optimal number of trailers for milk-run system. Designated method is created based on MS Excel. In the literature analysis, authors describe milk-run intralogistics systems, advantages and disadvantages of this system, and the issue related to determining the optimum number of means of transport. Described developed method defines several basic steps leading to determining the optimal number of trailers, based on the specificity of the production system, the size, and distribution of demand, the characteristics of the selected trailers types and the size of transport containers. In described approach, authors also include the determination of the size and frequency of deliveries, based on the specificity of the orders from workstations and the arrangement of the bus stops. All stages of the analysis are presented based on the example of the selected theoretical production system. The goal of determination of optimal number of trailers is minimizing the cost of purchasing vehicles, ensuring safe, timely, and efficient supplies of parts to individual locations, while minimizing traffic congestion and the achievement of proper use of available labor resources.

Keywords

Milk-run Intralogistics Logistics Transport 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The work was carried out as part of the POIR.01.01.01-00-0485/17 project, “Development of a new type of logistic trailer and methods of collision-free and deadlock-free implementation of intralogistics processes,” financed by NCBiR.

References

  1. 1.
    Brar, G.S., Saini G., Milk run logistics: literature review and directions. In: Proceedings of the World Congress on Engineering 2011, WCE 2011, vol. I, pp. 797–801 (2011)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Greenwood, A.G., Kluska, K., Pawlewski, P.: A multi-level framework for simulating milk-run, in-plant logistics operations. In: Bayo, J., Vale, Z., Hallerborg, K., Nathieu, P. (eds.) Highlights in Cyber Physical Multi-agent Systems, the PAAMS Collection—International Workshop of PAAMS 2017 (2017)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Greenwood, A.G., Kluska, K., Pawlewski, P.: A hybrid modeling approach for simulating milk-run in-plant logistics operations. In: Bayo, J., Vale, Z., Hallerborg, K., Nathieu, P. (eds.) Highlights in Cyber Physical Multi-Agent Systems, the PAAMS Collection—International Workshop of PAAMS 2017 (2017)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Karagul, H., Albayrakoglu, M.M.: Selecting a third-party logistics provider for an automotive company: an analytic hierarchy process model (2007)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Knez, M, Gajsek, B.: Implementation of in-plant milk-run systems for material supply in lean automotive parts manufacturing. In: International Conference on Logistics and Sustainable Transport (2015)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Meyer, A.: Milk Run Design: Definitions, Concepts and Solution Approaches. Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, KIT Scientific Publishing, Karlsruhe (2015)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Nemoto, T., Hayashi, K., Hashimoto, M.: Milk-run logistics by Japanese automobile manufacturers in Thailand. Procedia Soc. Behav. Sci. 2(3), pp. 5980–5989 (2010)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Zhenlai, Y.E., Yang J.: Development and application of milk-run distribution systems in the express industry based on saving algorithm. Math. Probl. Eng. 2014, No. 536459, 1–6 (2014)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Zhenlai, Y., Yang, J.: Development and application of milk-run distribution systems in the express industry based on saving algorithm. Math. Probl. Eng. 2014(536459), 1–6 (2014)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Chair of Production Engineering and Logistics, Faculty of Engineering ManagementPoznan University of TechnologyPoznanPoland

Personalised recommendations