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Asserting Adequacy: The Crescendo of Voices to Determine Daylight Provision for the Modern World

  • Oriel PrizemanEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter reviews the legacy and formulation of the authority behind emphatic 20th century guidance on daylight design. The degree to which these standards were created in response to the experience of industrial atmospheres in Britain is perhaps unsurprising, however, the extrapolation and determination of standards from precedent has a much less logical path. Whereas the quantification of artificial light was ultimately required to enable its commodification for sale, estimates of adequate quantities of daylight would be based on human experience and methods for its measurement derived in part from seemingly obscure coincidences of legal precedent and anecdotal suggestion.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Welsh School of ArchitectureCardiff UniversityCardiffUK

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