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Ideological Transfer in the Translation Activity: Power and Gender in Emma Donoghue’s Kissing the Witch

  • María Amor Barros del RíoEmail author
  • Elena Alcalde Peñalver
Chapter

Abstract

The relation between translation and Gender Studies has long been the object of academic attention (Federici et al. 2011; Nissen 2002; Von Flotow 2011). However, this coalition rarely constitutes the object of study from a translation perspective. The aims of our research were to raise awareness on gender issues among third-year students of a Spanish Language and Literature Degree and to foster a critical perception of translation. A three-phase methodology was designed with a pre- and post-test translation activity. Results show that this methodology helped students develop a critical translation process when gender issues are implied. We conclude that an integrated approach in the training of translators with the inclusion of a gender perspective should be increasingly encouraged in academic settings.

Keywords

Emma Donoghue Gender Translation Power Irish literature Fairy tales 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • María Amor Barros del Río
    • 1
    Email author
  • Elena Alcalde Peñalver
    • 2
  1. 1.University of BurgosBurgosSpain
  2. 2.University of AlcaláAlcalá de HenaresSpain

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