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Marriage and Family Transitions

  • Talha H. FadaakEmail author
  • Ken Roberts
Chapter

Abstract

Youth researchers in Europe and North America have spent recent decades noting how the life stage has been extended, and how transitions from childhood to adulthood have become more complicated and not always linear. They have noted that more young people than in the past are entering the labour market then returning to education, exiting then boomeranging back into their parents’ homes.

Keywords

Market making Market share Investment Value Performativity 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Umm Al-Qura UniversityMeccaSaudi Arabia
  2. 2.School of Sociology and Social PolicyUniversity of LiverpoolLiverpoolUK

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