Advertisement

The Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI)

  • Maria PolakisEmail author
  • Panos Zachariadis
  • Jan Otto de Kat
Chapter

Abstract

Thus far the only regulatory measure to reduce greenhouse gases (GHGs) from ships is the adoption of the Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI) by the IMO in 2011. This chapter will go over the rationale behind EEDI and the important factors that influence compliance of a vessel’s Attained EEDI with the regulatory limit of ship-type specific reference lines (Required EEDI) set by the IMO. This chapter will also go over related concepts and requirements, such as the Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan (SEEMP) and the Energy Efficiency Operational Indicator (EEOI). Concerns around possible implications directly linked or relevant to the EEDI framework will be outlined, including EEDI vs minimum propulsion power. The Existing Vessel Design Index (EVDI) rating of RightShip will also be presented. Last but not least, a discussion of the weaknesses of EEDI will be provided.

Abbreviations

AER

Annual Efficiency Ratio

AHEWG-TT

Ad Hoc Expert Working Group on Facilitation of Transfer of Technology for Ships

BIMCO

Baltic and International Maritime Council

CO2

Carbon dioxide

CSI

Clean Shipping Index

DCS

Data Collection System

DWT

Deadweight

EEDI

Energy Efficiency Design Index

EEOI

Energy Efficiency Operational Indicator

EIAPP

Engine International Air Pollution Prevention

ETS

Emission trading system

EVDI

Existing Vessel Design Index

FORS

Fuel Oil Reduction Strategy

FPSO

Floating production storage and offloading

FSU

Floating storage unit

GHG

Greenhouse gas

GT

Gross tonnage

IACS

International Association of Classification Societies

IEE

International Energy Efficiency

IMO

International Maritime Organization

ISO

International Organization for Standardization

ITTC

International Towing Tank Conference

LNG

Liquefied natural gas

MARPOL

The International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships

MCR

Maximum continuous rating

MEPC

Marine Environment Protection Committee

MPP

Minimum propulsion power

PP

Propulsion power

PSC

Port State Control

RO

Recognized organization

SEEMP

Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan

SFOC

Specific fuel oil consumption

SMS

Safety management system

VLCC

Very large crude carrier

Notes

Disclaimer

The views and opinions expressed in this chapter are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position or views of American Bureau of Shipping or organizations that the authors belong to.

References

  1. ClassNK. (2015). TEC-1048 survey and certification for EEDI and SEEMP required by the Amendments to ANNEX VI of MARPOL 73/7827.Google Scholar
  2. IACS. (2016). Procedural requirement, procedure for calculation and verification of the Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI), PR No. 38.Google Scholar
  3. IMO. (2011a). Resolution MEPC.203(62) “Amendments to the Annex of the Protocol of 1997 to amend the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973, as modified by the Protocol of 1978”.Google Scholar
  4. IMO. (2011b). MEPC 62/5/6, Submitted by Greece, “Further prospects for EEDI improvement”.Google Scholar
  5. IMO. (2011c). MEPC 63/4/15, Submitted by Greece, “Minimum design speed for bulk carriers and oil tankers”.Google Scholar
  6. IMO. (2012a). Resolution MEPC.212(63): “2012 Guidelines on the Method of Calculation of the Attained EEDI for new ships”.Google Scholar
  7. IMO. (2012b). Resolution MEPC.213(63), “2012 Guidelines for the development of a ship energy efficiency management plan (SEEMP)”.Google Scholar
  8. IMO. (2012c). Resolution MEPC.214(63): “2012 Guidelines on Survey and Certification of the EEDI”, IMO MEPC.Google Scholar
  9. IMO. (2012d). Resolution MEPC.215(63): “Guidelines for Calculation of Reference Lines for Use With the Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI)”.Google Scholar
  10. IMO. (2012e). MEPC.1/Circ.796 “Interim Guidelines for the Calculation of the Coefficient f w for Decrease in Ship Speed in a Representative Sea Condition for Trial Use”.Google Scholar
  11. IMO. (2013a). Resolution MEPC.231(65): “2013 Guidelines for calculation of reference lines for use with the energy efficiency design index (EEDI)”.Google Scholar
  12. IMO. (2013b). Resolution MEPC.232(65): “2013 Interim Guidelines for determining minimum propulsion power to maintain the maneuverability”.Google Scholar
  13. IMO. (2013c). Resolution MEPC.233(65): “2013 Guidelines for calculation of reference lines for use with the Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI) for cruise passenger ships having non-conventional propulsion”.Google Scholar
  14. IMO. (2013d). Resolution MEPC.229(65), “Promotion of Technical Co-Operation and Transfer of Technology Relating to the Improvement of Energy Efficiency of Ships”.Google Scholar
  15. IMO. (2013e). MEPC.1/Circ.815: “2013 Guidance on treatment of innovative energy efficiency technologies for calculation and verification of the attained EEDI for ships in adverse conditions”.Google Scholar
  16. IMO. (2014a). MEPC.1/Circ.795.rev1 “Unified Interpretations to MARPOL Annex VI”.Google Scholar
  17. IMO. (2014b). Resolution MEPC.254(67): “2014 Guidelines on Survey and Certification of EEDI (one amendments made in MEPC 68)”.Google Scholar
  18. IMO. (2014c). Resolution MEPC.245(66): “2014 Guidelines on the method of calculation of the Attained Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI) for new ships, adopted 4 April 2014”.Google Scholar
  19. IMO. (2015a). Determining minimum propulsion power to maintain the manoeuvrability of ships in adverse conditions. (Resolution MEPC.232(65), as amended by Resolution MEPC.255(67)), adopted on 15 May 2015.Google Scholar
  20. IMO. (2015b). MEPC.1/Circ.850/Rev.1 “Amendments to the 2013 Interim Guidelines for Determining Minimum Propulsion Power to Maintain the Manoeuvrability of Ships in Adverse Conditions”.Google Scholar
  21. IMO. (2015c). MEPC 68/3/28, Submitted by Greece, “Proposed revision of the 2013 Interim Guidelines for determining minimum propulsion power to maintain the manoeuvrability of ships in adverse conditions”.Google Scholar
  22. IMO. (2015d). MEPC 68/INF.30 2015 industry guidelines on calculation and verification of the Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI).Google Scholar
  23. IMO. (2015e). TTT course on energy efficient ship operation – M2 ship energy efficiency regulations and related guidelines.Google Scholar
  24. IMO. (2016a). MEPC 69/INF.28: “Further technical and operational measures for enhancing the energy efficiency of international shipping, submitted by Brazil”.Google Scholar
  25. IMO. (2016b). Resolution MEPC.282(70): “Guidelines for the Development of a Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan (SEEMP)”.Google Scholar
  26. IMO. (2017). Resolution MEPC.292(71): “Guidelines For Administration Verification of Ship Fuel Oil Consumption Data”.Google Scholar
  27. IMO. (2018). Resolution 301(72): “Amendments to MARPOL Annex VI (ECAs and required EEDI for Ro-Ro cargo ships and Ro-Ro passenger ships).Google Scholar
  28. IMO MARPOL Annex VI. (2013). MARPOL Annex VI and NTC 2008 with guidelines for implementation, 2013 Edition, IMO.Google Scholar
  29. ISO. (2015). 15016: 2015, ships and marine technology – Guidelines for the assessment of speed and power performance by analysis of speed trial data.Google Scholar
  30. ITTC. (2017). Recommended procedures and guidelines, speed and power trials, 7.5-04-01-01.2.Google Scholar
  31. Psaraftis, H. N. (2018). Decarbonization of maritime transport: to be or not to be? Maritime Economics and Logistics. https://doi.org/10.1057/s41278-018-0098-8.
  32. Smith et al. (2016). O2 Emissions from International Shipping - Possible reduction targets and their associated pathways.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria Polakis
    • 1
    Email author
  • Panos Zachariadis
    • 2
  • Jan Otto de Kat
    • 1
  1. 1.American Bureau of ShippingHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Atlantic Bulk Carriers Management, Ltd.PiraeusGreece

Personalised recommendations