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Stroke Risk Factors in Women

  • Emer R. McGrathEmail author
  • Kathryn M. Rexrode
Chapter

Abstract

Stroke is the leading cause of acquired adult disability worldwide and the fourth leading cause of death in women in developed countries. Approximately 60% of stroke deaths occur in women. Women have a number of unique risk factors for stroke, including pregnancy and its related complications, duration of reproductive life, use of oral contraceptives and postmenopausal hormone therapy. Furthermore, the prevalence of traditional stroke risk factors and the strength of their association, varies by sex. Prior to stroke, women who develop stroke more commonly have atrial fibrillation, hypertension and migraine while men with stroke are more likely to have coronary artery and peripheral vascular disease. In this chapter we will focus specifically on risk factors for stroke in women.

Keywords

Stroke Risk factor Women Prevention Epidemiology 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of NeurologyBrigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  2. 2.Division of Women’s Health, Department of MedicineBrigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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