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Increasing Tolerance Plants to Heavy Metals

  • Evgeny Aleksandrovich GladkovEmail author
  • Olga Victorovna Gladkova
Conference paper

Abstract

Lawn grasses, the important part of a city landscape, contrary to lifeless components, bring the natural color which is a little softening rigidity of surrounding buildings. However, the urban conditions are extremely unfavorable for the growth of lawn grass, because of the high level of contamination with heavy metals. Cell selection technologies have proven themselves in the preparation of plants and cell cultures tolerant to different environmental stressors: drought, low and high temperatures, salinity, but works on obtaining monocots, tolerable to lead and zinc virtually none. The object of our study was lawn grass—Agrostis stolonifera L. The authors developed technology for obtaining plants A. stolonifera, resistant to lead. Resistant cells were selected after 2–3 subcultivation of calli on modified Murashige and Skoog medium containing 650 mg/l Pb. Regeneration and root formation were performed on Murashige and Skoog medium containing 650 mg/l Pb too. The authors developed technology for obtaining plants A. stolonifera, resistant to zinc. Therefore, by means of cell selection, it is possible to raise an ecological valence to lead and zinc and partially to solve the most important environmental problem of city gardening—decorative effect loss, at rather low level of pollution and in certain cases partial degradation of city lawns at the raised level of lead and zinc in a soil cover.

Keywords

Agrostis stolonifera Lead Zinc Heavy metals 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Evgeny Aleksandrovich Gladkov
    • 1
    Email author
  • Olga Victorovna Gladkova
    • 1
  1. 1.Timiryazev Institute of Plant Physiology, Russian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia

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