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The Consequences of Brexit for the UK and for the Area of Freedom, Security and Justice

  • Helena CarrapicoEmail author
  • Antonia Niehuss
  • Chloé Berthélémy
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in European Union Politics book series (PSEUP)

Abstract

This chapter outlines the potential impact of Brexit on the UK’s internal security, as well as the EU’s Area of Freedom, Security and Justice, focusing specifically on police and judicial cooperation, and migration, asylum and border issues. Despite the UK’s limited participation in judicial cooperation and migration and asylum policies, there are manifold potential consequences of Brexit in these areas, with the chapter concluding that Brexit holds both positive and negative consequences for the EU in these fields while damaging the UK’s internal security and involving a number of challenges for future cooperation.

Keywords

Brexit Police cooperation Judicial cooperation in criminal matters Asylum and migration Border management 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Helena Carrapico
    • 1
    Email author
  • Antonia Niehuss
    • 2
  • Chloé Berthélémy
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Politics and International RelationsAston UniversityBirminghamUK
  2. 2.School of International RelationsUniversity of St AndrewsSt AndrewsUK
  3. 3.Sciences Po LilleLilleFrance

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