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Health and Safety in a Changing World

  • Paul AlmondEmail author
  • Mike Esbester
Chapter

Abstract

The chapter analyses how the normative legitimacy of health and safety was enacted in Britain since 1960, particularly in relation to why health and safety was carried out and the extent to which it was democratic in nature. It focuses on the major changes to the British economy and occupational structure since c.1960 and the impacts these had on participation in health and safety. It also considers the economics of health and safety and the changing nature of trade unionism, including the role of safety representatives. Finally, it demonstrates how health has been marginalised for much of the last 60 years and the difficulties faced regulating this aspect of health and safety.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of LawUniversity of ReadingReadingUK
  2. 2.School of Area Studies, History, Politics and LiteratureUniversity of PortsmouthPortsmouthUK

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