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Deficiency One Theory

  • Martin Feinberg
Chapter
Part of the Applied Mathematical Sciences book series (AMS, volume 202)

Abstract

The Deficiency Zero Theorem tells us, among other things, that for all weakly reversible deficiency zero networks taken with mass action kinetics, the induced differential equations admit precisely one equilibrium in each positive stoichiometric compatibility class. This holds true regardless of values the rate constants take and regardless of how intricate the differential equations might be. It turns out that there is an easily described but even broader class of networks for which the same statement can be made. This is the subject of the Deficiency One Theorem.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Feinberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, The Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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