Advertisement

Surfing the Tides of Political Tumult: Supply Chain Risk Management in an Age of Governmental Turbulence

  • Michael E. SmithEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series in Supply Chain Management book series (SSSCM, volume 7)

Abstract

While the dominant focus in discussions of supply chain risk management has been on dyadic relationships, even a very cursory familiarity with global events should serve to make it clear that business interests are profoundly impacted by politics, and the speed and frequency of the shifting political tides are expanding at a pace that is almost unimaginable.

References

  1. Chipman, J. (2016). Why your company needs a foreign policy. Harvard Business Review, 94(9), 36–43.Google Scholar
  2. Gelles, D., Landon, T., Ross Sorkin, A., & Kelly, K. (2017). Rebellion by business leaders spelled end of trump councils. The New York Times, A1.Google Scholar
  3. Ghemawat, P. (2017). Globalization in the age of Trump. Harvard Business Review, 95(4), 113–123.Google Scholar
  4. Global Agenda Council on Geo-economics (2016). The age of economic coercion: How geo-politics is disrupting supply chains, financial systems, energy markets, trade and the internet. World Economic Forum, White Paper, (http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_Age_of_Economic_coercion.pdf).
  5. Hellman, J., & Kaufmann, D. (2001). Confronting the challenge of state capture in transition economies. Finance & Development, 38(3), 31–35.Google Scholar
  6. Keim, G. (2001). Business and public policy: Competing in the political marketplace. In M. Hitt, R. Freeman, & J. Harrison (Eds.), Handbook of strategic management (pp. 583–601). Malden, MA: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  7. Khanna, P., & Mitachi, T. (2016). Supply chains as a coercive landscape. In: Global Agenda Council on Geo-economics (Eds.), The age of economic coercion: How geo-politics is disrupting supply chains, financial systems, energy markets, trade and the internet. World Economic Forum, White Paper, (http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_Age_of_Economic_coercion.pdf).
  8. Rice, C., & Zegart, A. (2018). Managing 21st-century political risk. Harvard Business Review, 96(3), 130–138.Google Scholar
  9. Smith, M. E. (2012). Too big for the individual firm: Creating cooperative networks to solve difficult supply chain risk challenges. In O. Kahn & G. A. Zsidisin (Eds.), Handbook for supply chain risk management: case studies, effective practices and emerging trends (pp. 45–52). J Fort Lauderdale, FL: Ross Publishing.Google Scholar
  10. Smith, M. E. (2016). Supply chain risk management in an era of economic coercion. In 16th International Research Seminar of Supply Chain Risk Management, International Supply Chain Risk Management Network. Steyr Austria.Google Scholar
  11. Toksöz, M. (2014). Guide to country risk: How to identify, manage and mitigate the risks of doing business across borders. New York: Perseus Book Group.Google Scholar
  12. Vargas-Hernandez, J. (2011). The multiple faces of corruption: Typology, forms and levels. Contemporary Legal and Economic Issues, 3, 269–290.Google Scholar
  13. Wright, C. M., Smith, M. E., & Wright, B. G. (2007). Hidden costs associated with stakeholders in supply management. Academy of Management Perspectives, 21(3), 64–82.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Dean of the School of Management, F. James McDonald Chair of Supply Chain ManagementKettering UniversityFlintUSA

Personalised recommendations