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The Semi-formal and Informal Economies of Film Distribution and Exhibition

  • Michael Kho Lim
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter fleshes out the concept of semi-formal economy and cites the different types of semi-formal distribution avenues. It also tackles the issue of piracy in the informal economy, which is rarely seen to contribute any value to the film value chain. It looks at the constructive effects or the “value” that piracy brings to a film and asks whether piracy could be used as a yardstick of an independent film’s success. It discusses how piracy is affecting the independent players and how they are addressing this issue. The chapter also delves into the role of audience in the distribution space and underscores its two-fold function as an informal distributor and marketer in the positive sense, and as a pirate in the negative sense.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Kho Lim
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of CommunicationDe La Salle UniversityManilaPhilippines
  2. 2.School of Media, Film and JournalismMonash UniversityMelbourneAustralia

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