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Bilingual Education and Minority Languages in China: Prospects and Challenges

  • Lubei Zhang
  • Linda Tsung
Chapter
Part of the Multilingual Education book series (MULT, volume 31)

Abstract

This chapter explores the deep-seated inequality of the Yi-Han bilingual language policy and discusses the challenges and prospects faced by the Yi-Han bilingual schools today. Conclusions have been made that while measures should be taken to guarantee the implementation of the top-down policies, to save minority languages, authorities should think more about how to create economic and political expansion for the Yi language so as to help it gain functional utility.

Keywords

Inequality Yi-Han bilingual policy Challenge Prospect Economic and political expansion Functional utility 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lubei Zhang
    • 1
  • Linda Tsung
    • 2
  1. 1.Southwest Jiaotong UniversityChengduChina
  2. 2.The University of SydneySydneyAustralia

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