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Introduction

  • Markus Schultze-Kraft
Chapter

Abstract

The concept of crimilegality has its roots in grounded observation and lived experience in the developing world, not abstract reasoning. In critical dialogue with conventional notions of organised crime and the political sociology of Max Weber and by taking recourse to the literatures on legal pluralism, neopatrimonialism, fragile statehood, hybrid political orders, oligopolies of violence and political settlements, the book underpins empirical illustrations of crimilegality with a robust conceptual-theoretical base. The selected cases of crimilegality and crimilegal governance are (violent) land grabbing and internal armed conflict termination in Colombia and (potentially violent) industrial-scale oil theft, massive fuel subsidy scamming and the suspension of mineral resource war in Nigeria.

Keywords

Crimilegality Organised crime Political order Developing countries Colombia Nigeria 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Markus Schultze-Kraft
    • 1
  1. 1.Universidad IcesiCaliColombia

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