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Melding of Two Worlds: Lessons Learned about PCIT and Autism Spectrum Disorders

  • Joshua J. MasseEmail author
  • Christina M. Warner-Metzger
Chapter

Abstract

Externalizing behaviors are a common co-occurring issue in young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). One evidence-based treatment for disruptive behaviors that has shown empirical and clinical success with a range of specialized populations is Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT). While the accumulating research for implementing PCIT with the ASD population is promising, clinical parameters for PCIT practice with ASD are dynamically evolving. The chapter presents lessons learned from the authors’ research and clinical experiences when implementing PCIT with the ASD population. The organization of the chapter overlays PCIT concepts onto the ASD diagnostic framework of the DSM-5, including severity and functional level of impairment. Although PCIT is a robust intervention which typically requires minimal changes in implementation for a variety of populations, having a basic understanding of ASD symptomatology and using level of functioning to inform when and how to tailor PCIT to ASD populations is crucial in obtaining positive clinical outcomes.

Keywords

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy Autism spectrum disorders Clinical considerations Functional impairment Language impairment Restricted/repetitive behaviors Sensory sensitivities social communication difficulties 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joshua J. Masse
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Christina M. Warner-Metzger
    • 3
  1. 1.University of Massachusetts DartmouthNorth DartmouthUSA
  2. 2.The Boston Child Study CenterBostonUSA
  3. 3.DePaul University Family and Community ServicesChicagoUSA

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