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Function-Based Interventions for Problem Behavior: Treatment Decisions and Feasibility Considerations

  • Sarah A. WeddleEmail author
  • Abbey B. Carreau
Chapter

Abstract

Clinicians assisting children with deficits in social interaction and communication are likely to be tasked with assessing and treating their problem behavior as well. While problem behavior can range in severity, clinicians are at an advantage when they know the function of the problem behavior, and the child’s relative or normative deficits in communication, tolerance for instruction, and preference for play. Thus, clinicians are positioned to implement or train parents on interventions that are functionally-based and/or empirically-supported which also have a greater likelihood of being effective. While intervention selection is a good place to start toward more positive outcomes for a child and family, there are other variables to consider that can further contribute to the success of an intervention plan. Once a clinician selects an intervention, the usability and fidelity can be improved by assessing and incorporating social validity factors into the decision-making process. Prior to implementation, clinicians should develop a detailed, yet succinct, intervention plan to establish consistency, train parents, and monitor integrity. This strategic approach to function-based intervention is rooted within an evidence-based framework.

Keywords

Problem behavior Intervention Intervention plan Evidence-based 

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.May InstituteRandolphUSA

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