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Food, Dietetics, and Imperialism

  • Jill H. WhiteEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Food Policy book series (FP)

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to expose the readers to the concept that we live in a system where food is produced for profit instead of meeting people’s nutrition and health needs and respecting the Earth.

Notes

Acknowledgments

I would like to thank and recognize the contribution of graduate students from Dominican University Fall 2017 Food and Social Justice class for their assistance in providing information for this paper, a proof again that seeking knowledge is always a collective activity, not a private property.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Nutrition ScienceDominican UniversityRiver ForestUSA

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