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The Circle of Security Intervention: Building Early Attachment Security

  • Glade L. TophamEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Circle of Security is an intervention that promotes sensitive and responsive caregiving behaviors in parents of young children who are at risk of attachment disorders. The goal of the intervention is to promote attachment relationships between the child and their primary caregiver. Secure attachment is promoted by encouraging responsive and sensitive interactions between the parent and the child. Parents are taught strategies to help them reflect on their own parenting behaviors and attachment histories as well as the behaviors and needs of the child. Three intervention formats include a 20-week psychoeducational/therapeutic group, an 8-week DVD psychoeducation group, and a four-session in-home intervention. An overview of the Circle of Security approach is provided along with a description of each of the three intervention protocols. Unique treatment considerations for different developmental levels are discussed, and current research on the efficacy and effectiveness of the intervention formats is reviewed.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Family Studies and Human Services, Kansas State UniversityManhattanUSA

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