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Some Possible Futures of Openly Sharing Learning

  • Shalin Hai-Jew
Chapter

Abstract

If it is true that the present age shows a retreat from globalism in a G-Zero world, then it may be that the appeal of creating online learning contents and learning sequences for free for the betterment of others may be a non-starter. If the ecosystem is about everyone for themselves, why start in a dominated position and sure-lose strategy? This chapter asks a critical question about what the future of open sharing may look like, and why. What would be the optimal (aspirational?) scenario (s) for humanity? What are some possible futures at the macro-, meso-, and micro- scales, and why? What are ways to reconfigure incentives and disincentives for the optimal outcomes? And most importantly, how does the reader see himself or herself (or themselves) in this space into the near-future, mid-term future, and long-term future, and how do they plan to get themselves into their desirable future?

Keywords

Open-shared learning Projected futures Sustainability Learning object economy 

Notes

Key Terms and Definitions

Lindy’s Law (Lindy Effect)

A concept that the length of time that something non-perishable has existed will suggest how much longer it will continue (longer survival rates of an object may indicate continuing longer term survival or life expectancy)

Open Sharing

The combination of open-access, open-source, and social-sharing of originally-created objects (in this case, learning objects and learning sequences)

Open Source

Availability of original source code

Point of View (POV)

A subjective perspective, a unique worldview

Possible Futures

Potential alternate (and somewhat mutually exclusive) prospects in the near-term, mid-term, and future term

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Additional Reading Section

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shalin Hai-Jew
    • 1
  1. 1.Information Technology Services (ITS)Kansas State UniversityManhattanUSA

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