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Requirements and Use Cases for Digital Sound Archives in Ethnomusicology

  • Jonas FrankeEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Current Research in Systematic Musicology book series (CRSM, volume 5)

Abstract

In this chapter, results from requirements elicitation activities for an ethnomusicological sound archiving software are summarized. Results derived from user and expert interviews as well as from literature of the sphere of ethnomusicology, computational musicology, archival studies and informatics. Interviews were conducted with stakeholders that are either involved in creation and maintenance of archiving software or who consider utilizing an archive software for private or professional use. Particular emphasis was placed on requirements and use cases that are supported by recent digital technologies. Online publishing, distributed systems and computational analysis of audio content and metadata can enable ethnomusicological sound archives to bring new value to their corpora. Publishing and sharing contents online can extend academic and private uses and computational analysis of archive contents can help to structure, access and maintain archives in novel ways. As a final result of requirements elicitation activities, technology, architecture and features of an archiving software built based off the findings are briefly presented and future tasks and challenges for this specific implementation are outlined.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for Systematic Musicology, University of HamburgHamburgGermany

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