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The Premature Start

  • Mary R. Tahan
Chapter

Abstract

The aborted first attempt at the South Pole by the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition is documented and analyzed in this chapter, with specific attention given to the men’s written perceptions regarding the unnecessary dangers created and the devastating loss of some of the sled dogs. As described in this account, this was the turning point in the journey. Roald Amundsen’s eagerness to begin too early, in too severe weather, causes great detriment for the dogs, danger for the men, and ensuing discord for the expedition. The return journey in particular, and Amundsen’s conduct, results in some of the dogs and the men being left behind on the barrier in dark and dicey conditions. Those who are left behind receive aid from an unexpected source.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary R. Tahan
    • 1
  1. 1.VancouverCanada

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