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An Alternative Provision

  • Julia Maria Muraszkiewicz
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Victims and Victimology book series (PSVV)

Abstract

Holding trafficked persons liable can lead to institutional victimisation and is far from the victim-centred approach that is championed in anti-human trafficking discourse.

References

  1. Broad, R., & Turnbull, N. (2018). From Human Trafficking to Modern Slavery: The Development of Anti-slavery Legislation in the UK. European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research, March, 1–15.Google Scholar
  2. De Hert, P. (2012). From the Principle of Accountability to System Responsibility: Key Concepts in Data Protection Law and Human Rights Law Discussions. In D. Guagnin, L. Hempel, L. Ilten, I. Kroener, D. Neyland, & H. Postigo (Eds.), Managing Privacy Through Accountability (pp. 88–120). Basingstoke: Springer.Google Scholar
  3. Mawby, R. I., & Walklate, S. (1994). Critica Victimology. London: Sage.Google Scholar
  4. Pham, J. (2015). Protecting Trafficking Victims from Prosecution: Analysis of the Modern Slavery Bill Defence [Online]. http://files.magdalenecambridge.com/pdfs/Publications/peter_peckard_prize_jp_july_2015.pdf.
  5. Piotrowicz, R. (2009). The Legal Nature of Trafficking in Human Beings. Intercultural Human Rights Law Review, 4, 175–203.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julia Maria Muraszkiewicz
    • 1
  1. 1.Trilateral Research & ConsultingLondonUK

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