Advertisement

Comparative Law as an Element of Reasoning

  • Hubertus Schumacher
Chapter

Abstract

There is still no communis opinio on the inclusion of comparative law as an element of reasoning in judicial decisions. There is no accepted plurality of methods which also includes comparative law in the traditional canons of historical, grammatical, systematic and teleological interpretation of judicial decisions. However, since the mid twentieth century, there has been growing internationalisation of case-law and jurisprudence as well as an increasing cross-border dimension to the search for internationally acceptable and just solutions. It is even sometimes claimed that we are in a ‘century of comparative law’. This trend involves taking account of the legal system and practice of other countries, but, in that regard, the courts do not march in step with science. Although at international level, in the extensive body of case-law, a comparative interpretation is still the exception rather than the rule, the decision-making practice of the courts of individual European States demonstrates an increasing willingness to rank comparative law amongst the traditional canons of interpretation. Reference should be made, in particular, to the Federal Supreme Court of Switzerland (Bundesgericht). Its affinity towards comparative law methods has even been described as a ‘conception universaliste’. The Swiss Federal Supreme Court has always been known to rely, in particular, on comparative law as a method of interpretation and has earned a reputation for taking the greatest account of comparative law when compared to international standards of national courts at final instance. In BGE 126 III 129 (138), the Swiss Federal Supreme Court even stated that ‘particularly in the event of conventional cross-border legal relations […], a proper determination of the law and therefore judicial gap-filling is not possible without a comparative law basis’. This sentence is more significant than it seems at first glance: comparative law plays a crucial role in the decision-making practice of the Swiss Federal Supreme Court in a very important area of commercial law. Kadner Graziano reports that an analysis of some 1500 judgments of the Swiss Federal Supreme Court from the 1990s revealed that the court refers to the external legal situation by way of comparison in approximately 10% of its judgments and, moreover, in judgments relating to liability, it makes a comparison in approximately 20% of the published decisions. In other continental European legal systems, one can observe only an occasional comparison with the laws of other countries. According to academia, the case-law of the Swiss Federal Supreme Court should be classified as recognising comparative law as an independent means of interpretation within the framework of a so-called ‘pragmatic plurality of methods’, but this is not the last word on the matter. Looking more broadly at the topic, there exists a clear emphasis on comparative law in judicial decision-making practice. It is reported from the Anglo-American legal sphere that constitutional courts are increasingly relying on the comparative method as a source of inspiration, and comparative law is by no means restricted to private law. In Austria, the Constitutional Court (Verfassungsgerichtshof) has had recourse to constitutional comparison on basis of the unstated presumption of its fundamental admissibility and effectiveness as an important source of potential knowledge.

References

  1. Amstutz M (2004) Interpretatio multiplex, Zur Europäisierung des schweizerischen Privatrechts im Spiegel von BGE 129 III 335. In: Honsell H, Zäch R, Hasenböhler F, Harrer F, Rhinow R, Koller A (eds) Privatrecht und Methode Festschrift für Ernst A. Kramer. Helbing und Lichtenhahn, Basel, Genf, München, p 67Google Scholar
  2. Baudenbacher C (2001) Lauterkeitsrecht, Kommentar zum Gesetz gegen den unlauteren Wettbewerb (UWG). Helbing und Lichtenhahn, BaselGoogle Scholar
  3. Baudenbacher C, Spiegel N (1990) Die Rechtsprechung des schweizerischen Bundesgerichts zum Verhältnis von Sachmängelgewährleistung und allgemeinen Rechtsbehelfen des Käufers – Ein Musterbeispiel angewandter Rechtsvergleichung? In: Brem E, Druey JN, Kramer EA, Schwander I (eds) Festschrift zum 65. Geburtstag von Mario M. Pedrazzini. Stämpfli, Bern, p 229Google Scholar
  4. Fuchs C (2010) Verfassungsvergleichung durch den Verfassungsgerichtshof. Jorunal für Rechtspolitik (JRP) 18(4):176–187CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Gauch P (2004) Juristisches Denken. Wie denken Juristen? In: Honsell H, Zäch R, Hasenböhler F, Harrer F, Rhinow R, Koller A (eds) Privatrecht und Methode Festschrift für Ernst A. Kramer. Helbing und Lichtenhahn, Basel, Genf, München, p 169Google Scholar
  6. Höfling W (1994) Die liechtensteinische Grundrechtsordnung, Liechtenstein Politische Schriften, Band 20. Verlag der Liechtensteinischen akadmeischen Gesellschaft, VaduzGoogle Scholar
  7. Hotz S (2012) Rechtspluralismus und Rechtsvergleichung, Zeitschrift für Europarecht. Int. Privatrecht und Rechtsvergleichung (ZfRV) (3):132Google Scholar
  8. Husa J (2005) Rechtsvergleichung auf neuen Wegen?, Zeitschrift für Europarecht. Int. Privatrecht und Rechtsvergleichung (ZfRV) (2):55Google Scholar
  9. Kadner Graziano T (2014) Rechtsvergleichung vor Gericht. Recht der internationalen Wirtschaft (RIW) 60(8):473Google Scholar
  10. Kischel U (2015) Rechtsvergleichung. C.H. Beck, MünchenGoogle Scholar
  11. Kodek GE (2013) Rechtsvergleichung als Auslegungsmethode im Privatrecht: akademischer Aufputz oder Bereicherung? In: Gamper A, Verschraegen B (eds) Rechtsvergleichung als juristische Auslegungsmethode. Jan Sramek Verlag, Wien, p 196Google Scholar
  12. Kohlegger K (2013) Franz Gschnitzer als Präsident des Fürstlich Liechtensteinischen Obersten Gerichtshofes. In: Barta H, Kohlegger K, Stadlmayer V (eds) Franz Gschnitzer Lesebuch. facultas.wuv, Wien, p 105Google Scholar
  13. Kozak W (2015) EuGH – Zug zur Rechtsvergleichung. In: Kozak W (ed) EuGH und Arbeitsrecht. Manz, Wien, p 59Google Scholar
  14. Kramer EA (1969) Topik und Rechtsvergleichung. Rabels Zeitschrift für ausländisches und internationales Privatrecht (RabelsZ) 33(1):1Google Scholar
  15. Kramer EA (2016) Juristische Methodenlehre. Stämpfli, BernGoogle Scholar
  16. Kunz PV (2009) Instrumente der Rechtsvergleichung in der Schweiz bei der Rechtssetzung und bei der Rechtsanwendung. Zeitschrift für Vergleichende Rechtswissenschaft (ZVglRWiss) 108(1):31Google Scholar
  17. Obwexer W (2013) Funktionalität und Bedeutung der Rechtsvergleichung in der Rechtsprechung des EuGH. In: Gamper A, Verschraegen B (eds) Rechtsvergleichung als juristische Auslegungsmethode. Jan Sramek Verlag, Wien, p 115Google Scholar
  18. Strauch H-J (2017) Methodenlehre des gerichtlichen Erkenntnisverfahrens. Verlag Karl Alber, Freiburg/MünchenGoogle Scholar
  19. Walter HP (2007) Das rechtsvergleichende Element – Zur Auslegung vereinheitlichten, harmonisierten und rezipierten Rechts. Zeitschrift für Schweizerisches Recht 126:259Google Scholar
  20. Zweigert K (1949/50) Rechtsvergleichung als universale Interpretationsmethode. Rabels Zeitschrift für ausländisches und internationales Privatrecht (RabelsZ) 15:6Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hubertus Schumacher
    • 1
  1. 1.Princely Supreme Court of LiechtensteinVaduzLiechtenstein

Personalised recommendations