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Experimental Action and Inclusion: The Ethics of Pragmatic Humanism

  • Ana Honnacker
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Humanism and Atheism book series (SHA)

Abstract

How can we know what is right and wrong without referring to objective moral values? Pragmatic humanism suggests grounding moral obligations in the demands of sentient beings and the basic principle of preventing harm. Thus, it advocates a minimal and negative ethics with an experimental character: the moral order is the result of an ongoing process that aims at including and integrating a maximum of demands. Yet, exclusions and failures are unavoidably part of this process and have to be dealt with. Pragmatic humanism offers no ready-made solutions to moral problems but fosters moral autonomy.

Keywords

Ethics Morality Values Evil Relativism Inclusion 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ana Honnacker
    • 1
  1. 1.Research Institute for Philosophy HannoverHannoverGermany

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