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Human Inquiry and the Authority of Science

  • Ana Honnacker
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Humanism and Atheism book series (SHA)

Abstract

Science has become a major source of knowledge. Yet, if we take it to be the only authority on understanding the world, the legitimate trust in the results of scientific research can easily turn into a quasi-religious belief. Pragmatic humanism defies such a scientism and the implied reductionist worldview. It rather pleads for a naturalism that acknowledges the primacy of human experience and therefore understands science as one way of inquiry among others. Since science is a human activity, it is not a disinterested quest for truth. Hence, the way science is practiced and organized comes into focus. Pragmatic humanism advocates a pluralization of science and underlines its relevance for democracy.

Keywords

Science Scientism Naturalism Supernaturalism Democracy Research 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ana Honnacker
    • 1
  1. 1.Research Institute for Philosophy HannoverHannoverGermany

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