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Prevention of Work: Related Musculoskeletal Disorders Using Smart Workwear – The Smart Workwear Consortium

  • Carl Mikael LindEmail author
  • Leif Sandsjö
  • Nafise Mahdavian
  • Dan Högberg
  • Lars Hanson
  • Jose Antonio Diaz Olivares
  • Liyun Yang
  • Mikael Forsman
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 876)

Abstract

Adverse work-related physical exposures such as repetitive movements and awkward postures have negative health effects and lead to large financial costs. To address these problems, a multi-disciplinary consortium was formed with the aim of developing an ambulatory system for recording and analyzing risks for musculoskeletal disorders utilizing textile integrated sensors as part of the regular workwear. This paper presents the consortium, the Smart Workwear System, and a case study illustrating its potential to decrease adverse biomechanical exposure by promoting improved work technique.

Keywords

Ergonomics Human factors Human-Systems integration Work technique Smart textiles Musculoskeletal disorders Prevention 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The Smart Workwear Consortium is funded by Vinnova, the Swedish Innovation Agency, under the call Challenge Driven Innovation (Vinnova/UDI 2016-03782), and by the participating organizations. The Smart Workwear Consortium partners are Hultafors Group; Avonova; Feelgood; Fraunhofer-Chalmers Centre; Karolinska Institutet; KTH Royal Institute of Technology; Scania CV; Swerea IVF; University of Borås; University of Gävle; University of Skövde; Volvo Trucks and Volvo Cars.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carl Mikael Lind
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Leif Sandsjö
    • 3
    • 4
  • Nafise Mahdavian
    • 5
  • Dan Högberg
    • 5
  • Lars Hanson
    • 5
    • 6
  • Jose Antonio Diaz Olivares
    • 2
  • Liyun Yang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mikael Forsman
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Unit of Occupational Medicine, Karolinska InstitutetStockholmSweden
  2. 2.Division of Ergonomics, KTH Royal Institute of TechnologyHuddingeSweden
  3. 3.Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social WelfareUniversity of BoråsBoråsSweden
  4. 4.Design & Human Factors/Department of Industrial and Materials ScienceChalmers University of TechnologyGothenburgSweden
  5. 5.School of Engineering ScienceUniversity of SkövdeSkövdeSweden
  6. 6.Scania CVSödertäljeSweden

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