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Defining User Needs for a New Sepsis Risk Decision Support System in Neonatal ICU Settings Through Ethnography: User Interviews and Participatory Design

  • Richard HarteEmail author
  • Leo R. Quinlan
  • Evismar Andrade
  • Enda Fallon
  • Martina Kelly
  • Paul O’Connor
  • Denis O’Hora
  • Patrick Pladys
  • Alain Beucheé
  • Gearoid ÓLaighin
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 876)

Abstract

The diagnosis of late onset sepsis in neonates is complex and therefore usually late, resulting in increased risks. The Digi-NewB project proposes a novel solution to this problem, by designing a non-invasive Decision Support System (DSS) which will use vital signs, images and sounds to measure the risk of sepsis in the preterm infant and therefore support clinicians in diagnosis. The introduction of any new system to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) environment presents a challenge for designers who must account for a technology laden environment and a demanding work-load for clinicians. To define the user needs and therefore build the first use cases for such a system, a multi-method approach was adopted and is described in this paper. This approach consisted of a period of ethnography, eleven semi-structured interviews and the application of a prototyping exercise based on the principles of participatory design.

Keywords

User-Centered Design Participatory design Codesign Neonatal 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard Harte
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Leo R. Quinlan
    • 2
    • 3
  • Evismar Andrade
    • 1
    • 2
  • Enda Fallon
    • 4
  • Martina Kelly
    • 4
  • Paul O’Connor
    • 5
  • Denis O’Hora
    • 6
  • Patrick Pladys
    • 7
    • 8
  • Alain Beucheé
    • 7
    • 8
  • Gearoid ÓLaighin
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Electrical and Electronic Engineering, College of Engineering and InformaticsNUI GalwayGalwayIreland
  2. 2.Human Movement LaboratoryNUI GalwayGalwayIreland
  3. 3.Physiology, School of MedicineNUI GalwayGalwayIreland
  4. 4.Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering and InformaticsNUI GalwayGalwayIreland
  5. 5.General Practice, School of MedicineNUI GalwayGalwayIreland
  6. 6.School of PsychologyNUI GalwayGalwayIreland
  7. 7.Centre Hospitalise Universities de Rennes (CHU Rennes)RennesFrance
  8. 8.Faculté de Médicine de l’Université de RennesRennesFrance

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