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Incorporating Human Factors in In-Plant Milk Run System Planning Models

  • Aleksandra Polak-Sopinska
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 876)

Abstract

The supply of materials to workstations in a manufacturing system can be realized in many different ways. In the last few years, the milk run based in-plant supply has been widespread. Researchers have developed many models for planning activities related to milk run systems and for enhancing the efficiency of such systems. The proposed models for planning milk run activities largely ignore workers’ characteristics or human factors, which leads to only partially realistic results. This paper contributes to the existing literature on milk run system planning models by literature review on integrating the human factor into milk run system planning and scheduling models and presenting the results of studies on physical intensity of an milk run operator’s work for selected milk run concepts.

Keywords

Human factors Physical intensity of work Energy expenditure Milk run system Logistics Efficiency 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The described research was carried by the research group IDEAT - Industrial Diagnosis & Ergonomic Accessibility for Technology Excellence.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Management and Production EngineeringLodz University of TechnologyLodzPoland

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