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Multiresistant Microorganisms and Infection Control

  • Elisabeth PresterlEmail author
  • Magda Diab-El SchahawiEmail author
  • Luigi Segagni Lusignani
  • Helga Paula
  • Jacqui S. Reilly
Chapter

Abstract

Multiresistant organisms are usually bacteria that are not susceptible to multiple classes of antimicrobial agents. MROs result in increased morbidity and mortality and prolonged hospital stays, and many are readily transmitted in the healthcare environment. The most epidemiologically important multiresistant pathogens are methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and the multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. The strategies for the prevention and control of multiresistant organisms in the hospital settings include hand hygiene, standard and transmission-based precautions, isolation of the patients, use of personal protective equipment, environmental cleaning and management of care equipment. An organism-specific approach is necessary to reduce the risk of transmission and outbreaks.

Keywords

Susceptibility Antibiotics Bacteria Surveillance Prevention measures 

Further Reading

  1. European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. Antimicrobial resistance surveillance in Europe 2016. Annual Report of the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Network (EARS-Net). Stockholm: ECDC; 2017. ISSN 2599-560X, ISBN 978-92-9498-099-1, https://doi.org/10.2900/296939.
  2. Tacconelli E, et al. Discovery, research, and development of new antibiotics: the WHO priority list of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and tuberculosis. Lancet Infect Dis. 2018;18(3):318–27. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(17)30753-3.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. WHO. WHO Guidelines for the prevention and control of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in health care facilities. Geneva: WHO; 2017. ISBN 978-92-4-155017-8.Google Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Magiorakos AP, et al. Multidrug-resistant, extensively drug-resistant and pandrug-resistant bacteria: an international expert proposal for interim standard definitions for acquired resistance. Clin Microbiol Infect. 2011;8(3):27.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elisabeth Presterl
    • 1
    Email author
  • Magda Diab-El Schahawi
    • 1
    Email author
  • Luigi Segagni Lusignani
    • 1
  • Helga Paula
    • 1
  • Jacqui S. Reilly
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Hygiene and Infection ControlMedical University of ViennaViennaAustria
  2. 2.Glasgow Caledonian UniversityGlasgowUK

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