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Genital Rejuvenation

  • Min-Wei Christine Lee
Chapter

Abstract

Female rejuvenation includes a range of functional and aesthetic procedures in the female genital region. More than half of the female population over age 50 suffers from stress urinary incontinence or some degree of uterine or pelvic organ prolapse. Almost all postmenopausal women have vaginal atrophy, dryness, dyspareunia, and other symptoms associated with menopause. Many of the symptoms associated with these common gynecologic disorders can be effectively and safely treated with lasers and other noninvasive devices. This is a comprehensive review and assessment of the scientific evidence regarding procedure selection, effectiveness, and safety of the available procedures in the area of female genital rejuvenation.

Keywords

Female rejuvenation Genital rejuvenation Vaginal rejuvenation Women’s health Feminine health Feminine wellness Female health Female wellness Lasers Erbium:YAG Carbon dioxide CO2 Fractional erbium:YAG Fractional CO2 Radiofrequency Nonablative Noninvasive 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Min-Wei Christine Lee
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.The Skin and Laser Treatment InstituteWalnut CreekUSA
  2. 2.Department of Dermatologic SurgeryUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA

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