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Co-occurring Mental Health Disorders

  • Valeria Tretyak
  • Justine W. WelshEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Substance use often has a significant overlap with psychiatric diagnoses such as major depressive disorder (MDD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), conduct disorder (CD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and bipolar disorder (BD). Many of these psychiatric conditions commonly go undiagnosed and untreated because of active substance use, which can complicate the clinical picture, mask underlying symptoms, and redirect the focus of clinical interventions. However, co-occurring mental health disorders can have a detrimental effect by increasing the severity of problematic substance use. Conversely, the use of substances can further exacerbate psychiatric symptoms, highlighting the importance for accurate and timely identification of co-occurring psychiatric conditions in adolescents with substance use.

Keywords

Co-occurring disorders Dual diagnosis Substance use disorder Internalizing disorders Externalizing disorders 

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Recommended Reading

  1. Brewer S, Godley MD, Hulvershorn LA. Treating mental health and substance use disorders in adolescents: what is on the menu? Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2017;19(1):5.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Hussong AM, Ennett ST, Cox MJ, Haroon M. A systematic review of the unique prospective association of negative affect symptoms and adolescent substance use controlling for externalizing symptoms. Psychol Addict Behav. 2017;31(2):137–47.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Priester MA, Browne T, Iachini A, Clone S, DeHart D, Seay KD. Treatment access barriers and disparities among individuals with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders: an integrative literature review. J Subst Abus Treat. 2016;61:47–59.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Welsh JW, Knight JR, Hou SS-Y, Malowney M, Schram P, Sherritt L, et al. Association between substance use diagnoses and psychiatric disorders in an adolescent and young adult clinic-based population. J Adolesc Health. 2017;60(6):648–52.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Yoshimasu K, Barbaresi WJ, Colligan RC, Voigt RG, Killian JM, Weaver AL, et al. Childhood ADHD is strongly associated with a broad range of psychiatric disorders during adolescence: a population-based birth cohort study. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2012;53(10):1036–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyThe University of Texas at AustinAustinUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryDell Medical School at The University of Texas at AustinAustinUSA
  3. 3.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesEmory University School of MedicineAtlantaUSA

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