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In Search of Hybridity: MacDowell, Grainger, and the End of Anachronisms

  • Ryan R. Weber
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Music and Literature book series (PASTMULI)

Abstract

Having explored the different points of intersection between the careers of Grieg and his contemporaries, this chapter focuses on the practices of Grainger and MacDowell in America. The key point of entry is the theme of hybridity, which functioned as a critical category and a set of strategies for musicians as it had for authors. It also demonstrates how Grainger and MacDowell developed circuitous notions of progress through their mutual fascination with Nordic sagas. Consequently, by tracing their procedures for combining various elements past and present, local and international, this chapter uncovers how both composers developed similar attitudes toward modernism, which were important factors in shaping their conceptualization of the temporal dimension of cosmopolitanism.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ryan R. Weber
    • 1
  1. 1.Misericordia UniversityDallasUSA

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