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Treatise of Digital Reconstruction and Restauration of Lace Porcelain

  • Lien Acke
  • Kristel De Vis
  • Tim De Kock
  • Erik Indekeu
  • Johan Van Goethem
  • Seth Van Akeleyen
  • Mathieu Cornelis
  • Jouke Verlinden
  • Stijn Verwulgen
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 11196)

Abstract

Lace porcelain is a fragile type of ceramics that is used to be in fashion in 19th century Dresden artworks. It is known to break easily while manual repair is nearly impossible. Instead, we considered digital scanning, reconstruction, and 3D printing of the damaged areas towards new digital restauration methodologies. One reference case was used throughout testing the enabling technologies, and the combination of micro CT and polyjet 3D printing proved to be most useful. However, defining a proper workflow are specifically digital modeling of porcelain lace requires complex modelling strategies, especially to make it fit for 3D printing.

Keywords

Porcelain lace Ceramics restoration Digital modeling 3D printing 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lien Acke
    • 1
  • Kristel De Vis
    • 1
  • Tim De Kock
    • 2
  • Erik Indekeu
    • 3
  • Johan Van Goethem
    • 4
  • Seth Van Akeleyen
    • 5
  • Mathieu Cornelis
    • 6
  • Jouke Verlinden
    • 5
  • Stijn Verwulgen
    • 5
  1. 1.Conservation-RestorationAntwerp UniversityAntwerpBelgium
  2. 2.PProGRess/UGCT, Department GeologyGhent UniversityGhentBelgium
  3. 3.Juwellery Design, Gold and SilversmithingUniversity College AntwerpAntwerpBelgium
  4. 4.RadiologyAntwerp University HospitalEdegemBelgium
  5. 5.Product DevelopmentAntwerp UniversityAntwerpBelgium
  6. 6.MaterialiseLeuvenBelgium

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