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Non-invasive Extremist Identification and Asset Maintenance

  • Vladimir TomaševićEmail author
  • Stanko Bulajić
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Science, Technology & Innovation book series (ASTI)

Abstract

Reactivity plagues academics and field operatives alike and generates false data that invariably lead to inappropriate resource allocation and ultimately failure to attain the desired operational and strategic goals. The only field tried and proved method of asset management, in terms of extremism control and successful prevention and/or damage control, is to maintain non-invasive identification and tagging methods that are the prerequisite for later intelligence gathering. Migratory crisis generated by the conflicts in Syria has opened a new gateway in international flow of extremism and increased migrant flow has given cover for transnational communication from Afghanistan, via Iran, Syria, and the Balkans into the EU and onwards. Furthermore it has given an opportunity for known and identified elements to disappear of the radar and become reintroduced in extremist activities back from where they have originated. Three main non-invasive methods of identification have been developed and tested; all of which are grounded in inter-group social interactions within the migrant “community”. Despite being publicly debated; they for the time being are insurmountable for extremists as they rely on two main causalities which they cannot control: behaviour of children and numbers of migrants.

Keywords

Extremist identification Anti-terrorism Balkans 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Belgrade School of Engineering ManagementUnion “Nikola-Tesla” UniversityBelgradeSerbia

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