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From Tinkering Around the Edges to Reconceptualizing Courses: Literacy/English Teacher Educators’ Views and Use of Digital Technology

  • Clare KosnikEmail author
  • Pooja Dharamshi
  • Lydia Menna
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter reports on a study of 28 literacy/English teacher educators in 4 countries (Canada, the USA, Australia, and England) with a focus on their use of digital technology. For analyzing the data, we used Ottenbreit-Leftwich et al.’s (2010) six different ways to incorporate technology into teacher education: information delivery, hands-on skill-building activities, practice in the field, observations and modeling, authentic experiences, and reflections (p. 20). Although most felt using digital technology in teacher education is very important, there were huge differences in how they used it. A few reconceptualized their courses to teach about, with, and through it, while others only used it mainly for information delivery. Two major challenges identified by most were that their university only provided limited support and mostly for technical problems (not pedagogical support) and that student teachers were not necessarily discerning users of resources on the web.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Ontario Institute for Studies in EducationUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Simon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada
  3. 3.University of AlbertaEdmontonCanada

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