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Seeking an Alternative: “Male” Shōjo Fans Since the 1970s

  • Patrick W. Galbraith
Chapter
Part of the East Asian Popular Culture book series (EAPC)

Abstract

This chapter focuses on male engagement with shōjo (for girls) manga and shōjo (girl) characters in manga and anime in Japan since the 1970s. It is well-known that shōjo manga underwent a renaissance in the 1970s, when female artists began to experiment with speculative fiction, poetics, the grammar of comics, depictions of psychological conflict and sexuality. What is less known is that men were also attracted to works by these artists in the 1970s. The existence, let alone motivation, of male shōjo fans seems sketchy at best, and is often dismissed broadly in terms of the “Japanese Lolita complex.” Based on personal and published interviews, this chapter raises the possibility of “male” shōjo fans seeking an alternative to hegemonic forms of masculinity and media.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patrick W. Galbraith
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of Interdisciplinary Information StudiesThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan

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