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The Use of Compression to Treat Venous Leg Ulcers in Traditional Chinese Medicine Practice

  • Xian Xiao
  • Qi Wang
  • Yao Huang
  • Pengwen Ni
  • Yunfei Wang
  • Ting Xie
Chapter

Abstract

Venous leg ulcers are common in China where both Western (Allopathic) and Traditional Chinese Medicine systems coexist. This chapter is focused on the TCM and the use of compression and other techniques to manage this condition. The report is based on translation of reports in Chinese language and give the reader an understanding of the use of oral and topical medicines and the use of compression in modern China where up to date modern diagnostic facilities exist in both systems of care.

Keywords

Venous leg ulcers Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) Compression 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors acknowledge Prof. Raj Mani for critical modification to the article.

Authors’ contribution: Xian Xiao and Qi Wang administered reviewing literatures. Yao Huang and Pengwen Ni performed translational work. Yunfei Wang provided TCM methods of treating leg ulcers. Ting Xie was responsible to supervising the work and drafting manuscript.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xian Xiao
    • 1
  • Qi Wang
    • 1
  • Yao Huang
    • 1
  • Pengwen Ni
    • 1
  • Yunfei Wang
    • 2
  • Ting Xie
    • 1
  1. 1.Wound Healing Center at Emergency DepartmentNinth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of MedicineShanghaiChina
  2. 2.LongHua HospitalShanghai University of Traditional Chinese MedicineShanghaiChina

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