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Alternative Technological Approaches to Achieving Improved Venous Return

  • Mark C. RichardsonEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The role and importance of compression in achieving venous return is well understood and the use of multilayer compression remains the standard of care for the patient with a Venous Ulcer. However a range of alternative technologies have emerged which aim to reduce or overcome some of the disadvantages of bandaging. This chapter explores methods of pressure assessment under bandages to facilitate application of bandages and also discusses alternatives to bandaging including adjustable systems, Intermittent Pneumatic Compression (IPC) Systems and finally powered muscle stimulators. All these approaches, as the evidence supporting them develops, could offer useful alternatives to compression for a number of patient groups.

Keywords

Venous ulcers Venous disease Compression bandages Blood flow 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of SouthamptonSouthamptonUK

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