Advertisement

A “First Look” on Frailty: A Scientometric Analysis

  • Elisa Pedroli
  • Pietro Cipresso
  • Silvia Serino
  • Desirèe Colombo
  • Michelle Semonella
  • Andrea Gaggioli
  • Giuseppe Riva
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes of the Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering book series (LNICST, volume 253)

Abstract

Frailty is a new and interesting concept that describes a preclinical condition in which elderly are more vulnerable and the possibility to develop pathologies increases. Often, the physical decline is related to cognitive impairments: Subjects in this situation are defined as cognitive frail patients. The literature connected to this syndrome is growing steadily and a bibliometric analysis is needed to better understand the evolution and the current state of the art. In this article, several domains are analyzed: Authors, categories, countries, institutions and journals. An interesting scenario emerged from the data: On the one hand, outcomes show a strong interest in understanding the real diffusion of this phenomenon using demographics and statistical methods. On the other hand, it emerged the increasing application of mathematical models to the study of medical phenomena.

Keywords

Frailty Scientometric Bibliometric Cognitive frailty 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The article was supported by the Italian funded project “High-end and Low-End Virtual Reality Systems for the Rehabilitation of Frailty in the Elderly” (PE-2013-02355948).

References

  1. 1.
    Woollacott, M., Shumway-Cook, A.: Attention and the control of posture and gait: a review of an emerging area of research. Gait Posture 16(1), 1–14 (2002)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Fried, L.P., et al.: Frailty in older adults: evidence for a phenotype. J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci. 56(3), M146–M156 (2001)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Gobbens, R.J., et al.: Toward a conceptual definition of frail community dwelling older people. Nurs. Outlook 58(2), 76–86 (2010)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Speechley, M., Tinetti, M.: Falls and injuries in frail and vigorous community elderly persons. J. Am. Geriatr. Soc. 39(1), 46–52 (1991)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Fried, L.P., et al.: Untangling the concepts of disability, frailty, and comorbidity: implications for improved targeting and care. J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci. 59(3), 255–263 (2004)MathSciNetCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Rockwood, K.: What would make a definition of frailty successful? Age Ageing 34(5), 432–434 (2005)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Kelaiditi, E., et al.: Cognitive frailty: rational and definition from an (IANA/IAGG) international consensus group. J. Nutr. Health Ageing 17(9), 72–734 (2013)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Delrieu, J., et al.: Neuropsychological profile of “cognitive frailty” subjects in MAPT study. J. Prev. Alzheimer’s Dis. 3(3), 151 (2016)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Panza, F., et al.: Cognitive Frailty: A Potential Target for Secondary Prevention of Dementia. Taylor & Francis, Milton Park (2017)Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Blake, A.J., et al.: Falls by elderly people at home: prevalence and associated factors. Age Ageing 17(6), 365–372 (1988)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Donald, I.P., Bulpitt, C.J.: The prognosis of falls in elderly people living at home. Age Ageing 28(2), 121–125 (1999)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Zijlstra, G.A., et al.: Prevalence and correlates of fear of falling, and associated avoidance of activity in the general population of community-living older people. Age Ageing 36(3), 304–309 (2007)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Kleinberg, J.: Bursty and hierarchical structure in streams. Data Min. Knowl. Discov. 7(4), 373–397 (2003)MathSciNetCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© ICST Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elisa Pedroli
    • 1
  • Pietro Cipresso
    • 1
    • 2
  • Silvia Serino
    • 1
    • 2
  • Desirèe Colombo
    • 1
    • 3
  • Michelle Semonella
    • 1
  • Andrea Gaggioli
    • 1
    • 2
  • Giuseppe Riva
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Applied Technology for Neuro-Psychology LabIRCCS Istituto Auxologico ItalianoMilanItaly
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyCatholic UniversityMilanItaly
  3. 3.Department of Basic Psychology, Clinic and PsychobiologyUniversitat Jaume ICastelló de la PlanaSpain

Personalised recommendations