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Active Communities and Practices of Resistance: Brief History of the Use of Schools as Border Zones in Toronto

  • Francisco J. VillegasEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter outlines various attempts to address the exclusion of undocumented students from Toronto schools. It argues that the proclamation of the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” (DADT) policy at the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) as new to Toronto is inaccurate and invisibilizes a history of struggle led by undocumented peoples and their allies. Through data stemming from interviews and gray literature, I describe different moments in time that re/created school board policies and procedures. I conclude by analyzing the development of the DADT Coalition and discuss the ways its conceptualization of access as well as its method of engagement different from previous moments of advocacy.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Anthropology and SociologyKalamazoo CollegeKalamazooUSA

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