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Continuing Important Conversations: An Introduction to This Volume

  • Francisco J. VillegasEmail author
  • Janelle Brady
Chapter

Abstract

Schooling has often been described as a great equalizer and entry point to social mobility. However, students, particular those inhabiting the intersections of oppression, experience myriad obstacles in realizing these possibilities. In this chapter, we outline a need for continued engagement in contending power inequities and highlight diverse possible methods of resistance discussed in subsequent chapters. We also revisit the difference between schooling and education and describe our analytic approach to engaging these oppressions and obstacles. We argue that the way to address power differential must encompass multiple methods, perspectives, and actions that work in parallel. Some of the methods and frameworks described and employed throughout this volume include anti-colonialism, anti-racism, Black, and African feminisms, to name a few, thus demonstrating the multiple ways communities can engage in resistance and change. The problems experienced in schooling today are not new, but they are compounded by newer logics, policies, and ideals such as neoliberalism, color-blindness, and efforts toward invisibilizing or justifying exclusion. We engage the concepts of transformative theory and practice and what it means to engage schooling critically in this chapter by challenging the ideals listed above. The chapter describes each contribution to the overall project and highlights the overall themes of how sections are organized. We conclude by discussing that while schooling in its current form is violent, we must not become hopeless. Our communities’ resistances have shown the value placed on schooling as a potential site of liberation.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Anthropology and SociologyKalamazoo CollegeKalamazooUSA
  2. 2.University of TorontoTorontoCanada

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