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Kinetic Analysis of the Thermal Behavior of the Sap of the Petroleum Plant for Producing Bio-Binders

  • Lilian Medeiros GondimEmail author
  • Sandra de Aguiar Soares
  • Suelly Helena de Araújo Barroso
Conference paper
Part of the RILEM Bookseries book series (RILEM, volume 20)

Abstract

The Petroleum Plant Sap is a bio-material that could be used for producing bio-binder in order to surrogate asphalt materials. Low amounts of this sap (up to 10%) were applied to an asphalt binder, resulting in very small changes of physical and rheological properties, what would indicate the degradation of some compounds of the sap. The present paper has the main purpose of analyzing the thermal degradation of the sap of the Petroleum Plant, what could point out the safe temperature range for applying the sap on paving applications. For that, thermogravimetry was performed on three heating ratios (5 °C/min, 10 °C/min and 40 °C/min) and the kinetic analysis of the data was processed. The results indicated that the temperature applied form the binder modification and aging simulating process were higher than the maximum safe temperature for the sap, that would be around 140 °C. It was also observed that the sap contains compounds that were oxidized during the heating process. The Thermogravimetric technique showed to be important for characterizing thermal behavior of bio-materials that are candidates for the formulation of bio-binders.

Keywords

Thermogravimetry Euphorbia Tirucalli Kinetic analysis 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors acknowledge FUNCAP for financial support and LUBNOR/Petrobras for the donation of the asphaltic binder samples.

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Copyright information

© RILEM 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lilian Medeiros Gondim
    • 1
    Email author
  • Sandra de Aguiar Soares
    • 2
  • Suelly Helena de Araújo Barroso
    • 2
  1. 1.Federal University of CaririJuazeiro do NorteBrazil
  2. 2.Federal University of CearaFortalezaBrazil

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