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The Not So Exemplary Example – Bangladesh National Police

  • Heath B. Grant
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Criminology book series (BRIEFSCRIMINOL)

Abstract

The case example of Bangladesh exemplifies many of the challenges that we have been speaking about this far with respect to policing in the developing world. The Bangladesh National Police is a very large force that is very strapped for necessary resources to be able to effectively police – both within the large urban center of cities like Dhaka to the very remote villages characteristic of the countryside. Bangladesh is a country characterized by both extreme poverty and high levels of corruption on the part of its police and other government services.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Heath B. Grant
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Law, Police Science and Criminal JusticeJohn Jay College of Criminal JusticeNew YorkUSA

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