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Epilogue: Control(ling) Space

  • Susan FlynnEmail author
  • Antonia Mackay
Chapter

Abstract

The concluding chapter exposes the problematic nature of surveillance culture shored up in architectural frames and through the built environment. Drawing on the environment narratives of surveillance to a point of conclusion, where the blurring of public and private, interior and exterior can be elucidated, the conclusion progresses the collection’s focus from the examples contained here, to a more global and overarching analysis, drawing on the issues at the heart of this study—the impact of being viewed—on human categories.

Bibliography

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  5. Pasternack, A. (2016, November 29). Laura Poitras Films The Architecture of Surveillance – And Projects Films on It Too. https://www.fastcompany.com/3066080/laura-poitras-and-the-architecture-of-surveillance. Accessed 28 July 2018.
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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of MediaLondon College of Communication, University of the Arts LondonLondonUK
  2. 2.Oxford Brookes UniversityOxfordUK

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