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Post Kidney Transplant: Hypertension

  • Vikram Patney
  • Fahad AzizEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Hypertension is common among kidney transplant recipients. Uncontrolled blood pressure in the kidney transplant recipients is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, and decreased graft survival. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) and American Society of Transplantation (AST) guidelines recommended a target blood pressure ≤130/80 in kidney transplant recipients. In this book chapter, we reviewed the available evidence based on randomized clinical trials and large observational studies in kidney transplant recipients. Based on the available data, it can be concluded: (a) a blood pressure target of ≤130/80 is a reasonable goal as suggested by KDIGO; (b) the choice of antihypertensive agent should be based on the patients’ other comorbidities; and (c) achieving good blood pressure control is more important than the choice of the antihypertensive agent.

Keywords

Hypertension Kidney transplant recipients Blood pressure targets Antihypertensives 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Nephrology and Hypertension SpecialistsFlorissantUSA
  2. 2.Department of Medicine, Division of NephrologyUniversity of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public HealthMadisonUSA

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