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Culture-Infused Counselling: Moving Forward with Applied Activism and Advocacy

  • Nancy ArthurEmail author
Chapter
Part of the International and Cultural Psychology book series (ICUP)

Abstract

Beyond cultural sensitivity, culture-infused counselling requires intentional actions to address social inequities and to address social justice. Readers are encouraged to continue their lifelong learning about culture, cultural identities, social locations, and social justice. Professionals can work collaboratively to take an active stance against oppression and work towards reconciliation, social justice, and the future health and wellbeing of all people. Social justice is an ethical stance that requires consideration of historical oppression and current social conditions and a commitment to reducing inequities and fostering an inclusive society. Through counselling and through other professional roles, counsellors enact social justice through applied activism and advocacy to challenge systems through multiple levels of interventions.

Keywords

Counselling interventions Culture-infused counselling Interprofessional practice Multicultural competency Multicultural counselling Social justice Advocacy Applied activism Ethics Systems change 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Werklund School of EducationUniversity of CalgaryCalgaryCanada

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