Advertisement

Infusing Culture and Social Justice in Ethical Practices with All Clients

  • Nancy Arthur
Chapter
Part of the International and Cultural Psychology book series (ICUP)

Abstract

This chapter introduces readers to the core concepts that undergird multicultural counselling with the lens of culture-infused counselling (CIC; Collins & Arthur, 2010a, 2010b) and the revised CIC framework outlined in Chap.  2). Readers are encouraged to consider how they define culture and who is included or excluded in their views. Connections are drawn between people’s cultural identities and social processes that lead to people’s experiences of relative privilege, marginalization and social inequities that are important determinants of people’s mental health. Codes of ethics and standards of practice are introduced for readers to consider general codes and specialist guidelines that address the practices of counselling and counselling psychology. The central argument advanced in the chapter is that culture and social justice are guiding concepts for ethical practice in all roles and responsibilities assumed by counsellors.

Keywords

Cultural contexts Cultural identities Culture-infused counselling Multicultural counselling Social justice Social location Ethics Standards of practice 

References

  1. Amundson, N. E. (2010). Metaphor making: Your career, your life, your way. Richmond, BC: Ergon Communications.Google Scholar
  2. Arredondo, P., & Toporek, R. (2004). Multicultural counseling competencies = ethical practice. Journal of Mental Health Counseling, 26(1), 44–55. https://doi.org/10.17744/mehc.26.1.hw2enjqve2p2tj6q.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Arredondo, P., Toporek, R., Brown, S., Sanchez, J., Locke, D. C., Sanchez, J., et al. (1996). Operationalization of the multicultural counseling competencies. Journal of Multicultural Counseling & Development, 24, 42–78. https://doi.org/10.1002/j.2161-1912.1996.tb00288.x.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Arthur, N. (2014). Social justice in the age of talent. International Journal of Educational and Vocational Guidance, 14(1), 47–60. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10775-013-9255-x.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Arthur, N., & Collins, S. (2010a). Introduction to culture-infused counselling. In N. Arthur & S. Collins (Eds.), Culture-infused counselling (2nd ed., pp. 3–26). Calgary, AB: Counselling Concepts.Google Scholar
  6. Arthur, N., & Collins, S. (2010b). Social justice and culture-infused counselling. In N. Arthur & S. Collins (Eds.), Culture-infused counselling (2nd ed., pp. 139–164). Calgary, AB: Counselling Concepts.Google Scholar
  7. Arthur, N., & Collins, S. (2014). Counsellors, counselling, and social justice: The professional is political. Canadian Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy, 48, 171–185. https://cuc-rcc.ucalgary.ca/cjc/index/php/rcc/article/view/2764
  8. Arthur, N., & Collins, S. (2015a). Multicultural counselling in Canada: Education, supervision, and research. In A. Sinacore & F. Ginsberg (Eds.), Canadian counselling and psychology in the 21st century (pp. 42–67). Montreal, QC: McGill-Queen’s University.Google Scholar
  9. Arthur, N., & Collins, S. (2015b). Culture-infused counselling and psychotherapy. In L. Martin & B. Shepard (Eds.), Canadian counselling and psychotherapy experience: Ethics-based issues and cases (pp. 277–304). Ottawa, ON: Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association.Google Scholar
  10. Arthur, N., & Collins, S. (2016). Multicultural counseling in a Canadian context. In N. Gazzola, M. Buchanan, O. Sutherland, & S. Nuttgens (Eds.), Handbook of counseling and psychotherapy (pp. 73–94). Ottawa, ON: Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association.Google Scholar
  11. Arthur, N., Collins, S., McMahon, M., & Marshall, C. (2009). Career practitioners’ views of social justice and barriers for practice. Canadian Journal of Career Development, 8, 22–31. Retrieved from http://cjcdonline.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/Career-Practitioners%CA%BC-Views-of.pdf
  12. Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association. (2007). Code of ethics (2nd ed.). Retrieved from https://www.ccpa-accp.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/CodeofEthics_en.pdf
  13. Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association. (2015). Standards of practice (5th ed.). Retrieved from https://www.ccpa-accp.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/StandardsOfPractice_en_June2015.pdf
  14. Canadian Psychological Association. (2017). Canadian code of ethics for psychologists (4th ed.). Retrieved from http://www.cpa.ca/docs/File/Ethics/CPA_Code_2017_4thEd.pdf
  15. Collins, S. (2010). The complexity of identity: Appreciating multiplicity and intersectionality. In N. Arthur & S. Collins (Eds.), Culture-infused counselling (2nd ed., pp. 247–258). Calgary, AB: Counselling Concepts.Google Scholar
  16. Collins, S., & Arthur, N. (2010a). Culture-infused counselling: A fresh look at a classic framework of multicultural counseling competencies. Counselling Psychology Quarterly, 23, 203–216. https://doi.org/10.1080/09515071003798204.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Collins, S., & Arthur, N. (2010b). Culture-infused counselling: A framework for multicultural competence. In N. Arthur & S. Collins (Eds.), Culture-infused counselling (2nd ed., pp. 45–66). Calgary, AB: Counselling Concepts.Google Scholar
  18. Collins, S., & Arthur, N. (2018). Challenging conversations: Deepening personal and professional commitment to culture-infused and socially-just counseling practices. In C. Audet & D. Paré (Eds.), Social justice and counseling: Discourse in practice (pp. 29–41). New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  19. Collins, S., Arthur, N., & Wong-Wiley, G. (2010). Enhancing reflective practice in multicultural counseling through cultural auditing. Journal of Counseling & Development, 88(3), 340–347. https://doi.org/10.1002/j.1556-6678.2010.tb00031.x.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Davidson, M. M., & Hauser, C. (2015). Multicultural counseling meets potentially harmful therapy: The complexity of bridging two discourses. The Counseling Psychologist, 43, 370–379. https://doi.org/10.1177/0011000014565714.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Fellner, K., John, R., & Cottell, S. (2016). Counselling indigenous peoples in a Canadian context. In N. Gazzola, M. Buchanan, O. Sutherland, & S. Nuttgens (Eds.), Handbook of counselling and psychotherapy in Canada (pp. 123–147). Ottawa, ON: Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association.Google Scholar
  22. Feminist Therapy Institute. (1999). Code of Ethics (revised). Retrieved from http://supp.apa.org/books/Supervision-Essentials/Appendix_D.pdf
  23. Gerstein, L. H., Rountree, C., & Ordonez, A. (2007). An anthropological perspective on multicultural counselling. Counselling Psychology Quarterly, 20, 375–400. https://doi.org/10.1080/09515070701567788.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Gonzalez, J., & Trimble, J. E. (2016). Counseling North American indigenous peoples. In P. Pedersen, W. Lonner, J. Draguns, J. Trimble, & M. Sharrón del Río (Eds.), Counseling across cultures (7th ed., pp. 101–120). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Greene, B. (2006). Psychology, diversity and social justice: Beyond hetersexism and across the cultural divide. Counselling Psychology Quarterly, 18, 295–306. https://doi.org/10.1080/09515070500385770.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Guinier, L., & Torres, G. (2002). The miner’s canary: Enlisting race, resisting power, transforming democracy. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  27. Helms, J., & Cook, E. (1999). Using race and culture in counselling and psychotherapy: Theory and process. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.Google Scholar
  28. Israel, T. (2012). 2011 Society of Counseling Psychology presidential address. Exploring privilege in counseling psychology: Shifting the lens. The Counseling Psychologist, 40, 158–180. https://doi.org/10.1177/0011000011426297.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Kennedy, B., & Arthur, N. (2014). Social justice and counselling psychology: Recommitment through action. Canadian Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy, 48,186–205. http://cjc-rcc.ucalgary.ca/
  30. Pedersen, P. (2001). Multiculturalism and the paradigm shift in counselling: Controversies and alternative futures. Canadian Journal of Counselling, 35, 15–25. http://cjc-rcc.ucalgary.ca/cjc/
  31. Pedersen, P., Crethar, H., & Carleson, J. (2008). Inclusive cultural empathy: Making relationships central in counseling and psychotherapy. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Pedersen, P., & Ivey, A. (1993). Culture-centered counseling and interviewing skills. Westport, CT: Praeger/Greenwood Press.Google Scholar
  33. Pettifor, J. (2010). Ethics, diversity, and respect in multicultural counselling. In N. Arthur & S. Collins (Eds.), Culture-infused counselling (2nd ed., pp. 167–188). Calgary, AB: Counselling Concepts.Google Scholar
  34. Samra, J. (2017). The evolution of workplace mental health in Canada: Research report (2007–2017). Retrieved from https://www.hrpa.ca/Documents/Public/Thought-Leadership/The-Evolution-of-Workplace-Mental-Health-in-Canada.pdf
  35. Sinclair, C. (2017). Canadian code of ethics for psychologists: Revised and approved. Psynopsis, 39(1), 36–37. Retrieved from http://www.cpa.ca/Psynopsis/
  36. Stewart, S. (2008). Promoting indigenous mental health: Cultural perspectives on healing from native counsellors in Canada. International Journal of Health Promotion and Education, 46, 49–56. https://doi.org/10.1080/14635240.2008.10708129.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Sue, D. W. (2015). Therapeutic harm and cultural oppression. The Counseling Psychologist, 43(3), 359–369. https://doi.org/10.1177/0011000014565713.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Sue, D. W., Arredondo, P., & McDavis, R. (1992). Multicultural counseling competencies and standards: A call to the profession. Journal of Counseling & Development, 70, 477–485. https://doi.org/10.1002/j.1556-6676.1992.tb01642.x.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Sue, D. W., & Sue, D. (1990). Counseling the culturally different: Theory and practice. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  40. Toporek, R., & Williams, R. (2006). Ethics and professional issues related to the practice of social justice in counseling psychology. In R. Torporek, L. Gerstein, N. Fouad, G. Roysircar, & T. Israel (Eds.), Handbook for social justice in counseling psychology (pp. 17–34). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  41. Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. (2015). Honouring the truth, reconciling for the future: Summary report of the truth and reconciliation commission of Canada. Retrieved from http://www.trc.ca/websites/trcinstitution/File/2015/Findings/Exec_Summary_2015_05_31_web_o.pdf
  42. Wendt, D. C., Gone, J. P., & Nagata, D. K. (2015). Potentially harmful therapy and multicultural counseling: Bridging two disciplinary discourses. The Counseling Psychologist, 43, 334–358. https://doi.org/10.1177/0011000014548280.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  43. Williams, B. (2003). The worldview dimensions of individualism and collectivism: Implications for counseling. Journal of Counseling & Development, 81, 370–374. https://doi.org/10.1002/j.1556-6678.2003.tb00263.x.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Winslade, J. (2018). Counseling and social justice: What are we working for? In C. Audet & D. Pare (Eds.), Social justice and counseling: Discourse in practice (pp. 16–28). New York: Routledge.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Werklund School of EducationUniversity of CalgaryCalgaryCanada

Personalised recommendations