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Pharyngitis

  • David Jager
  • Matthew L. Mintz
Chapter
  • 773 Downloads
Part of the Current Clinical Practice book series (CCP)

Abstract

A 40-year-old woman presents to her primary care physician complaining of fever, malaise, and sore throat for the last 3 days. The patient has a past medical history significant for hypothyroidism. She takes only levothyroxine pills and recent thyroid tests have been normal. The patient denied nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, cough, chest pain, and shortness of breath. She is a nursery school teacher who reports having taken care of multiple children with “colds” in the recent week. She drinks one glass of wine every week and denied smoking or other drug use. The patient is married and lives with her husband, who has not been sick.

Keywords

Sore Throat Rheumatic Fever Acute Rheumatic Fever Streptococcal Pharyngitis Throat Culture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Jager
    • 1
  • Matthew L. Mintz
    • 1
  1. 1.The George Washington University School of Medicine in Washington, DCUSA

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