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Mucormycosis

  • Brad SpellbergEmail author
  • Johan Maertens
Chapter

Abstract

Mucormycosis (formerly known as zygomycosis) is a life-threatening infection caused by fungi of the order Mucorales. Mucormycosis is an infectious emergency that typically occurs in patients with defects in host defense and/or with increased available serum iron, but can also occur after traumatic implantation of the etiologic fungi through skin. Recent years have witnessed some dramatic changes in the fungal taxonomy, etiology, epidemiology, and therapy of and outcomes from such infections, including in the transplant setting.

Keywords

Mucormycosis Mucorales Zygomycosis Rhizopus Infection Fungal Antifungals 

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Los Angeles County+University of Southern California (LAC+USC) Medical CenterLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Division of Infectious DiseasesKeck School of Medicine at USCLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Department of Hematology, Acute Leukemia and Stem Cell Transplantation UnitUniversity Hospital Gasthuisberg, K. U. LeuvenLeuvenBelgium

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